Enhancing the culture of scholarship

Education

Lisa Blitz; Professor Blitz is currently leading a research project titled School is for SELF: Safety, Emotions, Learning, and Family, a trauma informed culturally responsive approach for teachers, administrators, and other school personnel. The project centers on the adaptation of the Sanctuary Model (Bloom, 1997) to k-12 public schools in communities with high rates of poverty. Sanctuary is a trauma informed systems response designed to address secondary trauma and/or high stress levels among professionals and other staff as it guides approaches to responding to people of all ages impacted by toxic stress and interpersonal trauma. Exposure to toxic stress and trauma have been associated with difficulties in short term memory, concentration, attention, and other aspects of cognitive functioning that are fundamental to learning. One goal of this research is to help teachers and teacher aides integrate trauma informed approaches for classroom management and teaching styles that help support optimal learning and development for students.

The team uses a community based participatory research design that includes partnerships with school and community leaders for professional development and community outreach. Family engagement, youth leadership, school based and school linked mental health services, and training for school personnel are conducted in tandem with data collection and analysis. Direct services and professional development activities are modified as data is understood, so the research and services remain closely tied to the unique strengths and needs of a neighborhood and school. The research team works closely with the Broome County Promise Zone, a university-community-school partnership that is working to bring full service community schools to Broome County.

Laura Bronstein; Dean Bronstein is currently working on developing a model of collaboration among a university and county for a system of community schools.

Michael Lawson; Professor Michael Lawson's educational research focuses on student engagement in schools, classrooms, and school-community programs. He is particularly interested in understanding how engagement "works" for low-income children and youth across different contexts and settings (i,e. schools, families, peers, neighborhoods, and communities).

Robert Palmer; A primary focus of Professor Palmer's scholarship is improving access and success among underrepresented racial and ethnic minority students, specifically Black males in higher education generally and historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) specifically

Nadia Rubaii; Professor Rubaii's work with NASPAA: The Global Standard for Public Service Education has led the way in examining the opportunities for and challenges of international accreditation of public affairs education programs in universities outside the United States. She has drawn from the experiences in business and engineering education and has examined issues related to public service values, universal competencies, faculty and student diversity, and faculty qualifications, among other issues. She will continue this work during her Fulbright Scholar appointment in Colombia during 2014.

Myra Sabir; Professor Sabir is examining how older African Americans used education as the primary stepping stone toward meaningful work.

Marguerite Wilson; Professor Wilson uses qualitative methods from the discipline of anthropology to understand the cultures of alternative education settings. Specifically, I have done ethnographic work in two types of private alternative schools – Waldorf and Sudbury – to understand both the possibilities that these institutions have in challenging and transforming educational practices as well as how these schools confer educational advantages to their already privileged participants.

Diversity and inclusion

Lisa Blitz; Professor Blitz is currently leading a research project titled School is for SELF: Safety, Emotions, Learning, and Family, a trauma informed culturally responsive approach for teachers, administrators, and other school personnel. The project centers on the adaptation of the Sanctuary Model (Bloom, 1997) to k-12 public schools in communities with high rates of poverty. While Sanctuary emphasizes trauma informed responses appropriate for schools service communities with high poverty rates, the design is flexible, culturally responsive, and explicitly guides organizations toward full inclusion of diverse members. Thus, issues such as race, racism related stress, and white privilege; homophobia, transphobia, and heteronormativity; misogyny, sexism, and male privilege; classism and poverty related toxic stress; and other forms of oppression and privilege are all addressed within the model and as part of the research.

The team uses a community based participatory research design that includes partnerships with school and community leaders for professional development and community outreach. Family engagement, youth leadership, school based and school linked mental health services, and training for school personnel are conducted in tandem with data collection and analysis. Data is collected to understand barriers to cultural responsiveness. Direct services and professional development activities are modified as data is understood, so the research and services remain closely tied to the unique strengths and needs of a neighborhood and school. The research team works closely with the Broome County Promise Zone, a university-community-school partnership that is working to bring full service community schools to Broome County.

Suk-Young Kang; Professor Kang's research interests center on physical and mental health issues of older Asian Americans, as well as issues for those family members caring for their frail older family members with chronic illness and other health concerns. I have been interested in advancing the knowledge and skills of social workers and other health-care professionals to improve the mental and physical health of the vulnerable older Asian-American population. I use quantitative methods and analyses to explore these research interests.

Robert Palmer; A critical aspect of Professor Palmer's research focuses on equity as it relates to diverse institutional types (i.e., HBCUs) and supporting the success of racial and ethnic minority students in higher education. Nadia Rubaii; Professor Rubaii's work on immigrant integration has helped shape how local governments think about their roles within the US intergovernmental system as it relates to immigrants. She has worked with individual communities and with ICMA (the International City/County Management Association) and the International Hispanic Network to assess and inform policies and practices. Nadia Rubaii's research on cultural competencies within public affairs education has contributed to the dialogue on what current and future public servants need to know about diversity, how best to teach those skills, and the role of accreditation standards in forcing a meaningful assessment of cultural competence.

Issues of violence/resilience

Lisa Blitz; Professor Blitz is currently leading a research project titled School is for SELF: Safety, Emotions, Learning, and Family, a trauma informed culturally responsive approach for teachers, administrators, and other school personnel. The project centers on the adaptation of the Sanctuary Model (Bloom, 1997) to k-12 public schools in communities with high rates of poverty. Sanctuary is a trauma informed systems response designed to address secondary trauma and/or high stress levels among professionals and other staff as it guides approaches to responding to people of all ages impacted by toxic stress and interpersonal trauma. Toxic stress and exposure to trauma, including domestic and community violence, have been shown to be linked to numerous negative outcomes for children. If not addressed, adverse childhood experiences inhibit neurobiological development and last into adulthood contributing to numerous health, mental health, behavioral, and psychosocial difficulties. Our research seeks to develop and articulate a systems-level intervention that can support healing and resiliency for all members of the school community, with sensitive responses to the most vulnerable members.

The team uses a community based participatory research design that includes partnerships with school and community leaders for professional development and community outreach. Family engagement, youth leadership, school based and school linked mental health services, and training for school personnel are conducted in tandem with data collection and analysis. Direct services and professional development activities are modified as data is understood, so the research and services remain closely tied to the unique strengths and needs of a neighborhood and school. The research team works closely with the Broome County Promise Zone, a university-community-school partnership that is working to bring full service community schools to Broome County.

Lubna Chaudhry; Professor Chaudhry's research focuses on the impact of armed violence on communities in Swat especially on women, youth, and children. She is particularly concerned with how conflict is experienced by individuals located at particular class, ethnic, and gender locations, and how the intersection of resistance and survival plays in different life stories.

Robert Palmer; Professor Palmer's research focuses on issues of violence and resilience.

Social justice

Lisa Blitz; Professor Blitz is currently leading a research project titled School is for SELF: Safety, Emotions, Learning, and Family, a trauma informed culturally responsive approach for teachers, administrators, and other school personnel. The project centers on the adaptation of the Sanctuary Model (Bloom, 1997) to k-12 public schools in communities with high rates of poverty. Sanctuary emphasizes trauma informed responses that are appropriate for schools service communities with high poverty rates. Its design is flexible, culturally responsive, and explicitly guides organizations toward full inclusion of diverse members. Thus, social justice issues related to racial justice, economic justice, sexual identity justice, etc. are clearly addressed within the model and as part of the research.

The team uses a community based participatory research design that includes partnerships with school and community leaders for professional development and community outreach. Community partners include advocates for social justice and community organizers who are working for equity and justice for all members of the Broome County community. These partnerships both support the social justice perspectives in the research and create networks for accountability as the work proceeds. Data is collected on the formative aspects of the social justice work as the model evolves. Family engagement, youth leadership, school based and school linked mental health services, and training for school personnel are conducted in tandem with data collection and analysis. Direct services and professional development activities are modified as data is understood, so the research and services remain closely tied to the unique strengths and needs of a neighborhood and school. The research team works closely with the Broome County Promise Zone, a university-community-school partnership that is working to bring full service community schools to Broome County.

Robert Palmer; Professor Palmer's research includes many aspects of social justice.

Nadia Rubaii; Professor Nadia Rubaii's research on immigrant integration has challenged local government leaders to examine their responsibilities to promote justice at the community level often within an environment of challenging state and federal immigration policies.

Myra Sabir; Community-Based Participatory Research; Applied Intervention Research; Community Development

Children and families

Lisa Blitz; Professor Blitz is currently leading a research project titled School is for SELF: Safety, Emotions, Learning, and Family, a trauma informed culturally responsive approach for teachers, administrators, and other school personnel. The project centers on the adaptation of the Sanctuary Model (Bloom, 1997) to k-12 public schools in communities with high rates of poverty. Sanctuary is a trauma informed systems response designed to address secondary trauma and/or high stress levels among professionals and other staff as it guides approaches to responding to people of all ages impacted by toxic stress and interpersonal trauma.

The team uses a community based participatory research design that includes partnerships with school and community leaders for professional development and community outreach. Family engagement centers on direct outreach to families who are marginalized and/or struggling with the school system and developing small affinity groups, called Parent Cafés. Parent Cafés constitute a support network that can help build bridges of communication with school personnel and generate creative solutions to entrenched problems. Parent Cafés, along with youth leadership, school based and school linked mental health services, and training for school personnel are conducted in tandem with data collection and analysis.

Direct services and professional development activities are modified as data is understood, so the research and services remain closely tied to the unique strengths and needs of a neighborhood and school. The research team works closely with the Broome County Promise Zone, a university-community-school partnership that is working to bring full service community schools to Broome County.

Hyeyoung Kang; Professor Kang's research aims to better understand youth and family development in culturally diverse and "non-mainstream" contexts. First, my research focuses on immigrant youth and families. Second, my research examines youth development in the context of youth programs, specifically focusing on the role of families in youth's program-related experiences.

Michael Lawson; Professor Michael Lawson's research on children and families centers on an innovative model for engagement and support in low-income schools and communities. Developed by Dr. Tania Alameda-Lawson of the Department of Social Work, this innovative approach engages low-income parent "collectives" to develop programs and services that meet the needs of families at school and in the community. Research on this model has focused on exploring the social processes that accompany parents' engagement, together with the social and educational outcomes yielded from parents' collective efforts.

Youjung Lee; Despite the fact that many children are being raised by grandparents in the U.S., current mental health services and policies are not adequately meeting the needs of the custodial grandparents and their families. Grandparent-headed families face multiple challenges including family crisis, deterioration of health of the grandparents, limited support to childcare, and grandparents' difficulties navigating the K-12 education system. Moreover, their grandchildren have multiple risk factors including anxiety, depression, and insecurity which significantly impede school success. Therefore, Professor Lee developed an evidence-based transdisciplinary model for the grandparent-headed families to meet their needs and to increase well-being of the families. The transdisciplinary team of professionals will address bio-psycho-social aspects of custodial grandparenting and psychosocial well-being and academic confidence of the children.

Myra Sabir; Professor Sabir examines the ways in which narrative interventions foster improved physical, psychological, social, behavioral, and economic health; human bonding and attachment repair.

Marguerite Wilson; As an anthropologist of education and childhood, Professor Wilson uses qualitative methods to understand culturally-based values and theories about children and childhood. Recognizing that assumptions about children's development are quite varied across cultures, my work examines how childhood is conceptualized within the U.S. American white middle class, particularly among teachers and parents involved in radical alternative schooling.

Aging

Lisa Blitz; Professor Blitz is currently leading a research project titled School is for SELF: Safety, Emotions, Learning, and Family, a trauma informed culturally responsive approach for teachers, administrators, and other school personnel. The project centers on the adaptation of the Sanctuary Model (Bloom, 1997) to k-12 public schools in communities with high rates of poverty. Sanctuary is a trauma informed systems response designed to address secondary trauma and/or high stress levels among professionals and other staff as it guides approaches to responding to people of all ages impacted by toxic stress and interpersonal trauma.

The team uses a community based participatory research design that includes partnerships with school and community leaders for professional development and community outreach. Family engagement, youth leadership, school based and school linked mental health services, and training for school personnel are conducted in tandem with data collection and analysis. One of the university partners in the study, Dr. Youjung Lee, and I are conducting research into the unique experiences and needs of custodial grandparents. Dr. Lee is developing service responses for the grandparents that build upon their strengths, and these services are integrated into the School is for SELF approach.

Direct services and professional development activities are modified as data is understood, so the research and services remain closely tied to the unique strengths and needs of a neighborhood and school. The research team works closely with the Broome County Promise Zone, a university-community-school partnership that is working to bring full service community schools to Broome County.

Laura Bronstein; Dean Bronstein is working on the development of a model of social worker intervention to reduce hospital readmissions among older adults.

Suk-Young Kang; Professor Kang's research interests center on physical and mental health issues of older Asian Americans, as well as issues for those family members caring for their frail older family members with chronic illness and other health concerns. I have been interested in advancing the knowledge and skills of social workers and other health-care professionals to improve the mental and physical health of the vulnerable older Asian-American population. I use quantitative methods and analyses to explore these research interests.

Youjung Lee; Professor Lee is conducting research focused on the mental health of grandparents raising grandchildren. Many grandparents are struggling with high stress, challenges associated with parenting for a second time, depression, and decreased health status. Research shows grandparents with higher parenting stress have lower physical, social, and mental health. Therefore, I am exploring the factors that influence the mental health of the custodial grandparents in collaboration with school social workers and mental health professionals in Broome County. I plan to use the findings from this study to develop culturally sensitive programs and policies to enhance the quality of life of the grandparents.

Myra Sabir; Professor Sabir's research focuses on expanding our understanding of generativity and its impact in different domains of life; examining the ways in which narrative interventions foster generativity over the long term, benefiting both individuals and communities.

Civic engagement/participation

Susan Appe; Professor Appe is examining (with Professor Nadia Rubaii) the development and implications of international service learning in public affairs education.

Lisa Blitz; Professor Blitz is currently leading a research project titled School is for SELF: Safety, Emotions, Learning, and Family, a trauma informed culturally responsive approach for teachers, administrators, and other school personnel. The project centers on the adaptation of the Sanctuary Model (Bloom, 1997) to k-12 public schools in communities with high rates of poverty. Sanctuary is a trauma informed systems response designed to address secondary trauma and/or high stress levels among professionals and other staff as it guides approaches to responding to people of all ages impacted by toxic stress and interpersonal trauma.

The team uses a community based participatory research design that includes partnerships with school and community leaders for professional development and community engagement. Partners include members of local city government, state and county advocates, and diverse groups of community members and stakeholders who are invested in developing and sustaining healthy communities. The research team works closely with the Broome County Promise Zone, a university-community-school partnership that is working to bring full service community schools to Broome County. This partnership includes the Binghamton University Center for Civic Engagement, which helps coordinate opportunities for service learning. Qualitative, quantitative, and formative data are collected throughout the process, with a goal of articulating processes that can be replicated in other communities.

Nadia Rubaii; Nadia Rubaii's research on community level immigrant integration practices has identified best practices for engaging immigrant populations. With Susan Appe, Nadia Rubaii is examining the effectiveness of international service learning as a pedagogy to advance the goals of public affairs education and to provide value to students and to service partner institutions and communities in Latin America.

Myra Sabir; Professor Sabir's research examines the ways in which narrative interventions foster generativity, benefiting both individuals and communities; Community-Based Participatory.

Public and non-profit organizations

Susan Appe; Professor Appe conducts research that focuses on government-nonprofit relations and the dimensions and evolution of the nonprofit sector in both developed and developing countries. Currently, she is examining how government policy influences and shapes civil society and nonprofit organizations in Latin America; as well as how and why nonprofit organizations form national-level networks.

Lisa Blitz; Professor Blitz is currently leading a research project titled School is for SELF: Safety, Emotions, Learning, and Family, a trauma informed culturally responsive approach for teachers, administrators, and other school personnel. The project centers on the adaptation of the Sanctuary Model (Bloom, 1997) to k-12 public schools in communities with high rates of poverty. Sanctuary is a trauma informed systems response designed to address secondary trauma and/or high stress levels among professionals and other staff as it guides approaches to responding to people of all ages impacted by toxic stress and interpersonal trauma.

The team uses a community based participatory research design that includes partnerships with school and community leaders for professional development and community engagement. Partners include members of local city government, state and county advocates, and diverse groups of community members and stakeholders from public and non-profit organizations who are invested in developing and sustaining healthy communities. The research team works closely with the Broome County Promise Zone, a university-community-school partnership that is working to bring full service community schools to Broome County. This partnership includes the Binghamton University Center for Civic Engagement, which helps coordinate opportunities for service learning. Qualitative, quantitative, and formative data are collected throughout the process, with a goal of articulating processes that can be replicated in other communities.

Laura Bronstein; Dean Bronstein develops and tests models of collaboration across professional boundaries and across organizations.

Kristina Lambright; Professor Lambright examines the complexities associated with cross-organizational service delivery systems in the public and nonprofit sector. She is particularly interested in the mechanisms that both community members and the organizations involved in these partnerships use to provide feedback on these systems and their effectiveness. She also studies campus-based civic engagement and has explored the relationship between public administration scholars and practitioners as well as a variety of topics related to service learning.

Pamela Mischen; Professor Mischen conducts research on local government and local nonprofit capacity. Her research includes the role of knowledge management in strategic planning, local government response to natural gas drilling, and interorganizational network development and evolution. She uses a variety of methods in her research including social network analysis, qualitative methods, agent-based modeling and traditional statistical techniques.

Nadia Rubaii; Professor Rubaii's research has focused on how local governments respond to changing demographics, in terms of workforce diversity and in terms of immigrant populations in the community. Additionally, her research on international accreditation of public affairs programs contributes to the dialogue on quality in public affairs education with the ultimate goal of improving the level of ethics and professionalism among government officials at all levels and throughout the world.

Last Updated: 9/3/14