Latin Courses

ELEMENTARY LATIN I & II (LAT 101 & 102)
Two semesters of essential grammar and vocabulary for developing reading skills in classical Latin. First half (20 chapters) of the assigned grammar textbook will be completed along with significant introduction to Roman culture and ideals and some supplementary work in conversational Latin. For majors and non-majors.

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LAT 203)

Review of grammar and introduction to Latin literature and development of proficient reading skills through topical passages of real Latin on the lives and experiences of women of all social classes in the Roman world, including several female poets known to us. Three hours of class each week devoted to discussion and translation of select passages.

THE 'OTHER' IN LATIN COMEDY (LAT 380C)
In this advanced Latin reading course, we will explore selections from several Roman comedies of Plautus that highlight disfranchised contributors (slaves, foreigners, women) to the satirical Greco-Roman world of comedy. Format: Translation and discussion daily; occasional student reports, reading of scholarly articles and small group performances in Latin and English. Video of Latin performance. Prerequisites: LAT 203 or higher course in Latin

PASSION(S) IN OVID (LAT 380M)
In this advanced Latin reading course, we will explore significant selections of Ovid¿s epic of mythic (though not purely mythological) transformation, the Metamorphoses, and a few of his other poems with a constant eye to Ovid¿s many twists and turns on the presentation of passion, especially as manifested in eroticism, anger and appetite. We will also read the entire epic in translation so we may discuss Ovid¿s construction of particular books and his epic styling.

LATIN HISTORIANS ON CELTIC AND GERMAN ETHNICITY (LAT 381A)
In this advanced Latin reading course, we will examine the Roman presentation of other ethnic groups.  We will particularly study the Celtic/Gallic Nations most memorably profiled in Caesar’s Bellum Gallicum VI immediately prior to his famous encounter with Vercingetorix at Alesia, Tacitus’ ethnographic monograph on the Germans, and various ethnic studies (Thracians, Huns, Goths, as well as Romans and lawyers!) in Ammianus Marcellinus’ history of Rome in the 4th century CE.

THE AGE OF NERO (LAT 381C)
Did the Roman emperor Nero really fiddle while Rome burned, or have his mother murdered, or prowl the streets by night, looking for victims to rob and kill? In this advanced Latin reading course, we will explore the Age of Nero: its literature, its thought, its culture generally.

HORACE'S ODES&CATULLUS' POEMS (LAT 381H)
The Latin lyric poetry of Catullus and Horace represent two distinct but nevertheless closely related and extremely influential models of lyric expression. This course will focus on Book 1 of Horace's Odes along with a selection of poems from Catullus, with particular attention to sub-types of lyric including erotic verse, invitation poems, poems of abuse, political praise poetry, and hymns.

CICERO AND THE REPUBLIC FALTER (LAT 381O)
In this advanced Latin reading course, we will examine moments in the later/post-consular career of the famous orator and politician, Cicero, when he fell short of his best, whether in terms of oratorical delivery, case selection, or political miscalculation. In Latin, we will read two of his most famous speeches Pro Milone (against his arch-enemy, P. Clodius Pulcher, delivered before Pompey as sole consul) and the Second Philippic (a brilliant, but personally costly, broadside against Marc Antony, who was trying to consolidate power after Caesar’s assassination).

'AFRICANS' IN HISTORY AND EPIC (LAT 382A)
Readings in Vergil, Sallust and Livy that treat Punic and Numidian “Berber” ethnicity from Roman points of view.

MEDIEVAL LATIN (MDVL 381A)
In this course we will read selected texts from the whole medieval period (from Late Antiquity to the High Middle Ages) in a variety of genres (theology, poetry, history, travel, biography, letters, etc.). There will be a swift review of grammar and a consideration of how Medieval Latin differs from Classical Latin at the beginning of the semester, although questions of grammar will occupy us throughout the course.

Last Updated: 8/2/16