Latin Courses

ELEMENTARY LATIN I & II (LAT 101 & 102)
Two semesters of essential grammar and vocabulary for developing reading skills in classical Latin. First half (20 chapters) of the assigned grammar textbook will be completed along with significant introduction to Roman culture and ideals and some supplementary work in conversational Latin. For majors and non-majors.

INTERMEDIATE LATIN (LAT 203)

Review of grammar and introduction to Latin literature and development of proficient reading skills through topical passages of real Latin on the lives and experiences of women of all social classes in the Roman world, including several female poets known to us. Three hours of class each week devoted to discussion and translation of select passages. Over the course of the semester students will transition from Latin exercises highlighting grammatical precision to genuine Latin prose and verse texts. Introduction to several key genres of Latin literature, including satire, elegy, biography, letters, encyclopedias and history. Prerequisites: LAT 102 or placement by the instructor determined by consultation that confirms satisfactory prior acquisition of Latin grammar.

PASSION - OVID'S METAMORPHOSES (LAT 380A)
In this advanced Latin reading course, we will explore significant selections of Ovid¿s epic of mythic (though not purely mythological) transformation, the Metamorphoses, and a few of his other poems with a constant eye to Ovid¿s many twists and turns on the presentation of passion, especially as manifested in eroticism, anger and appetite. We will also read the entire epic in translation so we may discuss Ovid¿s construction of particular books and his epic styling.

MEDIEVAL LATIN, CODICOLOGY, & PALEOGRAPHY (LAT 380A)
This seminar has two goals: 1) to introduce students to the Latin language and literature of the late antique and medieval periods (ca. A.D. 200-1500). 2) to provide a theoretical and practical foundation for reading medieval manuscripts. Designed to move students toward independent work with Medieval Latin, the first part of the course emphasizes the close reading and careful translation of Medieval Latin texts and documents, with attention to vocabulary, orthography and syntax. The texts change each year, this year, the focus in on historiographical literature. Also designed to impart basic skills for independent research in medieval studies, the seminar will cover techniques for transcribing medieval texts. To support both goals, the course will include a survey of the development of scripts in the Middle Ages and of methods used in editing medieval texts, as well as an introduction to the most important reference works used in Medieval Latin scholarship, including lexica and bibliographies.

CICERO AND THE END OF THE ROMAN REPUBLIC (LAT 381B)
In this advanced Latin reading course, we will explore significant selections of Ovid¿s epic of mythic (though not purely mythological) transformation, the Metamorphoses, and a few of his other poems with a constant eye to Ovid¿s many twists and turns on the presentation of passion, especially as manifested in eroticism, anger and appetite. We will also read the entire epic in translation so we may discuss Ovid¿s construction of particular books and his epic styling.

THE AGE OF NERO (LAT 381C)
Did the Roman emperor Nero really fiddle while Rome burned, or have his mother murdered, or prowl the streets by night, looking for victims to rob and kill? In this advanced Latin reading course, we will explore the Age of Nero: its literature, its thought, its culture generally. Selections from the works of Seneca, Petronius (both men of standing at Nero's court), Tacitus, and Suetonius will illustrate how this period put age-old Roman values to the test, both to affirm and to subvert inherited ideals regarding gender, class, and politics. Format: Translation and discussion daily; quizzing; occasional student reports; reading of scholarly articles; brief lectures on contemporary developments in Roman politics, art, and culture; paper on modern cinematic interpretations of the Age of Nero.

HORACE'S ODES & CATULLUS' POEMS (LAT 381H)
The Latin lyric poetry of Catullus and Horace represent two distinct but nevertheless closely related and extremely influential models of lyric expression. This course will focus on Book 1 of Horace's Odes along with a selection of poems from Catullus, with particular attention to sub-types of lyric including erotic verse, invitation poems, poems of abuse, political praise poetry, and hymns. We will begin by considering what makes a Latin poem "lyric" and the relationship between the Latin lyric project and Ancient Greek lyric. Throughout the course we will combine close attention to the texts (through translation and analysis) with attention to the social, political, and cultural contexts in which these poems were written, and the various ways in which they have been interpreted.

INDEPENDENT STUDY (LAT 397 & 497)
Designed in consultation with Instructor

Last Updated: 10/30/15