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Courses Taught by David Klotzkin at Binghamton

EECE 506 Mathematical Methods in Electrical Engineering

3 Credits, 3hr lecture/week.

Course Objective: Primary focus: Applications of matrix theory, statistics, Fourier transforms to engineering problems. Guided study and seminar: selected topics in advanced engineering mathematics. Applications of available tools (Matlab, Mathematica) to engineering problems.

Textbook: Kreysig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 9th Ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1999

 

EECE 260 Electrical Circuits

4 Credits, 3hr lecture/week.

Course Objective: Analyze DC circuits containing resistors, capacitors, inductors using Ohms law, series/parallel combination, Norton and Thevenin's theorems and sourc transformation.  Analyze and design simple circuits using operational amplifiers.  Solve for transient and steady-state frequency response in circuits containing reactive elements.

Textbook: Basic Engineering Circuit Analysis, 9th Edition J. David Irwin and R. Mark Nelms Published by Wiley, ISBN 978-0-470-12869-5

 

ECEE 5XX Advanced Semiconductor Lasers (Spring 2010)

3 Credits, 3 hr. lecture/week with occasional demonstrations.

Course Objective: Learn the physics of semiconductor lasers and their theory of operation, as well as the device engineering, structure and performance characteristics of standard semiconductor laser structures, including advanced and tunable optoelectronic transmitters. The first half of this course covers the physics of semiconductor lasers, starting with a review of p-n junction theory.  From a rate equation model, external DC and dynamic characteristics will be related to intrinsic parameters.  The influence of cavity characteristics (such as facet coatings, length, and optical loss) on laser operation will be determined. The second part will cover different laser and transmitter structures and the particular physics relevant to each, such as distributed feedback lasers (coupling, gain margin, single mode operation and implications for laser transmission), vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, distributed Bragg reflectors, and electro-absorption modulators and semiconductor-based interference-based modulators.

Textbook: None (class notes)

Reference:

P. Bhattacharya, Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices, Prentice Hall, 1997.

G. Agrawal, Fiber-Optic Communications Systems, Wiley Interscience, 2002. 

B. Saleh, M. Teich. Fundamentals of Photonics, Wiley Interscience, 2002. 

 

Courses at University of Cincinnati

ECECS 481 Solid State Electronics I (Fall 2006, 2008)

3 Credits, 3hr lecture/week.

Course Objective: Learn the basic physics which governs semiconductor devices.  Topics include semiconductor crystal structure, energy band gap, electron and hole charge carriers, mobility, doping and carrier densities, Fermi level, generation and recombination, physics of p-n junction and Schottky diodes.  Study of semiconductor materials and their properties, p-n junctions and Schottky diodes as a basis for understanding the operation of modern transistors in integrated circuits.

Textbook: Streetman and Banerjee, Solid State Electronic Devices, Prentice Hall, 2000.

Detailed information about the course for the Fall 2006 session will be available on the University of Cincinnati Blackboard web site after late September, at blackboard.uc.edu. 

ECECS 614 Photonics Information Processing (Winter 2006)

3 Credits, approximately 6 laboratory hours/week

Course Objective: Explore the fundamentals of photonic systems through the analysis and characterization of optical and optoelectronic components.  This 10 week lab course is divided into three modules.  Module 1 is designed to explore the fundamentals of both free space (standard bulk) optics and fiber optics.  Experiments in this phase are geared toward 1) understanding the characteristics of optical and optoelectronic components 2) developing the skills necessary to set up photonic information processing systems.  Modules 2 and 3 are geared towards the exploration of advanced level topics.  Experiments in these modules are designed to demonstrate the concepts of photonic information processing through the construction and demonstration of several application oriented systems.

Textbook: Laboratory Manual and Instructor Handouts.

Reference: Bahaa E.A. Saleh and Malvin Carl Teich, Fundamentals of Photonics, Wiley, 1991.

D. C. O’Shea, Elements of Modern Optical Design, John Wiley and Sons, 1985.

E. Hecht, Optics, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1987. 

ECECS 784 Advanced Semiconductor Lasers (Spring 2007, 2008)

3 Credits, 3 hr. lecture/week with occasional demonstrations.

Course Objective: Learn the physics of semiconductor lasers and their theory of operation, as well as the device engineering, structure and performance characteristics of standard semiconductor laser structures, including advanced and tunable optoelectronic transmitters. The first half of this course covers the physics of semiconductor lasers, starting with a review of p-n junction theory.  From a rate equation model, external DC and dynamic characteristics will be related to intrinsic parameters.  The influence of cavity characteristics (such as facet coatings, length, and optical loss) on laser operation will be determined. The second part will cover different laser and transmitter structures and the particular physics relevant to each, such as distributed feedback lasers (coupling, gain margin, single mode operation and implications for laser transmission), vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, distributed Bragg reflectors, and electro-absorption modulators and semiconductor-based interference-based modulators.

Textbook: D. Klotzkin, Semiconductor Lasers in Communications, Springer (eventually)

Reference:  P. Bhattacharya, Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices, Prentice Hall, 1997

G. Agrawal, Fiber-Optic Communications Systems, Wiley Interscience, 2002.

B. Saleh, M. Teich. Fundamentals of Photonics, Wiley Interscience, 2002.

S. Kasap, Optoelectronics and Photonics: Principles and Practices

ECECS 251 Network Analysis II (Winter 2007, 2008)

4 Credits, 4 hr. lecture/week with occasional demonstrations.

Course Objective: Solutions of linear electrical networks containing inductors and capacitors; phasors; transient and steady-state frequency analysis; AC power circuits; Laplace transforms; frequency response; magnetically coupled circuits.

Textbook: Hayt and Kemmerly, Engineering Circuit Analysis, 6th or 7th.  Ed. McGraw Hill, 2002

Last Updated: 6/23/16