Faherty L. Nielsen


 

Education:
Ph.D. U.S. History, Binghamton University, 2016
M.A. U.S. History, Binghamton University, 2007
B.A. with Honors in History, Wells College, 2006

Specialty:
U.S. Race & Ethnicity: African American; Buffalo, NY History; Twentieth Century U.S.; American Law and Politics

Current Position: 

Executive Assistant to the Director, Burchfield Penney Art Center, Buffalo, NY

Dissertation: 

"'Obviously, this is not a Garden of Eden': Segregation, Desegregation, and Resegregation in Buffalo, NY, 1935–1996"

Adviser: Provost Donald G. Nieman


The Burchfield Penney Art Center is at the center of the current cultural rebirth of Buffalo, NY.  In my current position at The Center, I work with current artists, cultural leaders, and people who are committed to the creation of a "New Buffalo", and I also have the opportunity to highlight the rich cultural history of this great city through writing and programming.  A regional art center in the heart of the Buffalo community dedicated to the cultural vitality and creativity of Western New York that also serves as a "keeper of the past and explorer of 'the next'" is a perfect fit considering my specialty in Buffalo history.

My Buffalo roots and interest in community studies and local history inspired the topic of my dissertation, "'Obviously, this is not a Garden of Eden': Segregation, Desegregation, and Resegregation in Buffalo, NY, 1935–1996."  I highlight the city's rich ethnic history in order to analyze Buffalo's complicated race relations. The focus of the project is on the de jure segregation of the Buffalo Public School System and how local, state, and federal authorities helped create a discriminatory environment within the city.

While my dissertation is centered on the African American experience in Buffalo, my background is much more broad. Throughout my post-secondary education I studied race in the broader context of "other". My dedication to a comprehensive understanding of American history, and race and ethnicity more specifically, gives me experience in women's history, American legal history, immigration history, whiteness studies, Atlantic history, Latin American history, international human rights history, and African history. In addition to this extensive instructional experience, I also have teaching competency in my minor fields of study in the African Diaspora and Women, Gender, and Sexuality.

Grants, Fellowships, and Awards:

  • Joan S. Dubofsky Doctoral Research Grant, History Department, Binghamton University, 2013.
  • Graduate Student Teaching Assistantship, History Department, Binghamton University, 2006–2011.
  • Joan S. Dubofsky Doctoral Research Grant, History Department, Binghamton University, 2010.
  • Larry J. Hackman Research Residency Award, New York State Archives, Archives Partnership Trust, 2010.

Conferences and Invited Talks:

  • 'It's all now you see': The Legacy of Slavery and Its Impact on the Present," Invited Talk, "IMAGINE" Lecture Series, Center for the Study of Art & Architecture, History & Nature, Buffalo & Erie County Downtown Public Library, Buffalo, NY, April 19, 2016.
  • "'A saga of much talk and insufficient action': The Legacy of School Segregation in Buffalo, NY," Invited Talk, Activism Symposium, Wells College, Aurora, NY, March 28, 2014.
  • "'Not a bad place to live': Resegregation in the City of Good Neighbors, 1983–1996," Researching New York Conference: Perspectives on Empire State History, New York State Archives Partnership Trust/University at Albany, Albany, NY November 14–15, 2013.
  • "Segregation Tug-of-War: The Development & Disintegration of a Segregated School System in the North," Conference on New York State History, New York State History Association, Niagara Falls, NY, June 14–16, 2012.
  • "Segregation Tug of War: The Creation of a Segregated School System in the North," 21st Annual Milton Plesur Conference, University at Buffalo, Amherst, NY, March 31, 2012.
  • "Buffalo, An All America City: A Model of the Federal 'Negro Clearance' Program, 1940–1970," Graduate Student Conference, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, December 2008.
  • "The 'Greatest Hope': Black Press Coverage of the United Nations and Its Impact on American Policy, 1945–1952," Graduate Student Conference, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, December 2007.
  • "An 'Ideal' Forum: African American Petitions to the United Nations, 1946–1951," Graduate Association for African American History Conference, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, September 13–15, 2007.

Courses Taught:

  • HIST 380Z: Social Movements in US History, 1830–Present
  • HIST 380F: The Long Civil Rights Movement
  • HIST 285-01: American Legal History (Wells College)

Last Updated: 8/12/16