Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Note: Unless otherwise noted, all undergraduate courses carry four (4) credits.

Note: The following course descriptions, while indicating the nature and scope of the CCPA undergraduate programs, are not a historical record. Most courses carry four (4) semester hours of credit and meet one or two times per week. In the following lists, credit hours other than four (4) are noted following the course title.

HDEV 100 THE STUDY OF HUMAN CHANGE

This course provides first and second year Human Development majors with early exposure to the field of human development as a discipline concerned with societal, group, and individual transformation. The course covers, in an introductory fashion, human development theory and practice, and introduces students to human development faculty members' social transformation focused research. Students will learn of social entrepreneurs who are transforming society in such areas as rural electrification, college access, health care reform, and care for AIDS patients. Over the course of the semester, students will review the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights; encounter a range of human rights abuses; and examine some of the historical foundations of current structural inequalities in the US and in other places, settings, and nations. Students will examine alternatives to western social, political, and economic systems, and regularly engage in introspective writing exercises designed to help clarify their own passions for human change. Most importantly, students will have a chance to apply some of what they learn by self-selecting into groups to propose a response to an actual local community need chosen from a list compiled by residents of Binghamton, NY. Following proposal development, groups developing the top four proposals will have an opportunity to present their plan to the Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) Advisory Board. In other words, student groups will work to address real local needs and perhaps even see their plans carried forward. RESTRICTED TO FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY with HDEV MAJORS HAVING PRIORITY. HDEV majors may use as elective credit. Only grading option for this course is CCPA Standard Letter Grade.

HDEV 200. INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

This course is designed to provide students with an overview and understanding of the study of human development based on relevant theoretical approaches used in this area. In this course, students will explore a range of topics including: the study of human development; cross cultural theory and research; culture and socialization; physical and biological development in fancy and beyond; social emotional development in early development and across the lifespan; cognitive development; language development; personality development; gender development; sexual identity development; racial identity and socialization; culture and mental health; development in family contexts; and development and the future. This course also will engage students in an exploration of global-local contexts in relation to cross-cultural research and theoretical understandings of human development. Within these contexts, the course will provide an emphasis on multicultural conceptual approaches in the study of human development including but not limited to race, gender, social class, and sexuality.

HDEV 300. SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH METHODS

This course will introduce students to research methods used in conducting and reviewing social science research. A specific emphasis will be placed on basic research principles and concepts within the context of quantitative and qualitative methods used in the social sciences. The course will explore a range of topics including epistemology, research, and methods; theoretical models in research; ethics in research; quantitative and qualitative research design, measurement, sampling, and analysis; and multicultural epistemology, theory, and research. This course is intended to prepare human development students to provide critical analyses of social science research. They will learn that the production of research is political and value-laden. Another objective of this course is for students to become able to read and understand research methods provided in scholarly articles and to critically evaluate the value and limitations of published studies, to practice utilizing various research methods to answer questions about the social world, and to support interventions that improve communities.
Prerequisite: HDEV 200. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV. This course is not open to sophomore students.
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THEORIES OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (HDEV 301-339)

HDEV 301. MOTHERING IN CULTURAL CONTEXT

Why are most Disney princesses (even most Disney heroines for that matter) motherless? Why do we say "mother tongue" and "motherland" and not "faather tongue" and "fatherland"? Why do we see more interviews on television with the mothers of soldiers in the War on Terror than we do with fathers of these soldiers? Why are "bad mothers" more often in the limelight than "bad fathers"? The interdisciplinary course will analyze the multiple, and at times contradictory, meanings assigned to motherhood, mothering, and mothers in the contemporary global society, and the implications of these meanings for the existence and everyday reality of women, who desire, bear, and/or raise children, as well as those who do not. We will draw on social science research and theory as well as philosophical and humanist traditions, in order to locate the lived experiences of women who are others within the cultural, political, economic, and legal dimensions framing motherhood. Looking at a variety of cultural, racial, and national contexts, and understanding that gender is but one (though a central) element of the social construction of reality and identity, the course will primarily examine the following five inter-related themes and subjects: the interntion and development of motherhood as a modern "scientific" institution and a vocation with classed, raced, and colonial dimensions; the representations of mothers and motherhood; the theorizing of motherhood by influential intellectuals, particularly in the psychoanalytical stream; the range of feminist approaches to "mothering" (which is often times differentiated from "motherhood" with its patriarchal ideological underpinnings) and its impact; and the ways mothers themselves have portrayed their experiences and viewpoints in a variety of modes and genres.

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HDEV 304. PRENATAL, INFANT & TODDLER DEVELOPMENT

Utilizing evidence-based research, this course will provide students with a theory-into-practice foundation for the study and understanding of the development, health, and well-being of children from the prenatal period to thirty-six months. The course will begin with an examination of physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development from conception to birth, an overview of prenatal care and reproductive technologies, and insight into the process of labor and delivery - all the while focusing on influences and issues that contribute to healthy prenatal development. The remainder of the course will focus on infant and toddler development including the interrelationships between: heredity/genetics; the emotional, physical and social environment; physical/ motor development; nervous system development; perceptual development; development of learning processes and information processing; cognitive development; memory development; communication and language development; the development of emotions, temperament and character development; and the development of attachment and interactions. Students will examine the roles and responsibilities of parents, family members, caregivers, care providers, and child advocates, as well as federal, state, and community programs and policies that work to support the creation of culturally and developmentally appropriate environments for the unborn child, infant, and toddler and respectful, reciprocal relationships that educate, support, and empower families.

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HDEV 305. CHILD DEVELOPMENT

This course examines the various theories and practices that predominate in the United States' approach to children and child development. Building upon an integrated study of the bio-cultural, emotional, intellectual, social and psychological themes and growth patterns of children, the course emphasizes the politics and practices of studying, rearing, and educating children. The course explores numerous cross-cultural examples of the vast variation in approaches to child development around the world, as well as considering children's rights in cross-cultural context. Emphasis is placed on their implications for child-rearing, social practices and socio-cultural aspects of child development. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 306. ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

This course will provide an overview of adolescence, including social, cultural and historical contexts for development; physical and cognitive changes within the individual, together with socio-historical and cultural differences in our understanding of adolescence as a transitional period in life. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 307. NUTRITION THROUGH LIFESPAN 2 credits

Cross listed from NURS 325

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HDEV 309. DEATH, DYING AND BEREAVEMENT

This course examines issues surrounding aging, death, dying and bereavement from a developmental perspective. There is a special emphasis on understanding death in the context of our culture. Topics covered on aging include the physical social and cognitive changes associated with aging. Topics covered on death include suicide, euthanasia, cultural differences in understanding death and rituals surrounding death and dying. Topics covered on bereavement include the grieving process, adaptation, support, and pathological grieving. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 310. CHILD DEVELOPMENT: SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Inactive
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HDEV 311. ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT: SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Inactive
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HDEV 312. PREGNANCY, CHILDHOOD, MOTHERHOOD

Students will gain understanding of the psychological issues surrounding transition to motherhood. Cultural attitudes towards pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding and related topics will be contrasted. In addition, the impact of technology on fertility, pregnancy and birth will be discussed.

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HDEV 313. EXPLORING QUEER LIVES

Lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender people and others marginalized because of their sexuality and gender expression will be explored through the reading and discussion of theory, research, activist projects, and practice scenarios. Central to this course will be the principle that an adequate understanding of our own and others' experience of sexuality and gender expression can only be obtained at their intersection with other identities such as race, social class, ethnicity, and disability. This course takes a multi-level approach, exploring these issues within their individual, social and structural contexts. Reading and discussions will extend across disciplinary boundaries and include psychology, anthropology, sociology, history, political science, literary and cultural studies literatures. Goals are to recognize and describe (a) the way in which we come to understand about how sexuality and gender expression affect or should affect our practice in social sciences and (b) the way that minoritizing as well as more universalizing views of sexual injustice differently shape the goals of researchers, activists and practitioners. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 327. CULTURE AND CONTEXT IN DEVELOPMENT

This course will explore perspectives on the impact of culture and context on development. An emphasis will be placed on the role that structural inequalities based on race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexuality have on the development. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 328. MARRIAGE, FAMILY AND CHILD ADJ

Marriage, family, divorce and children's adjustment are important topics currently and for the future of our society. What factors influence a couple's decision to get married? How will they know if they are making the right decision? What makes some marriages a success and why do others end in divorce? What can be done to make the divorce process less stressful? How can we help children to adjust to parents' decisions to divorce? What can we do to make the divorce process less stressful? These questions will be addressed in the context of research from our text book and scholarly journal articles. The course will require students to discuss, write, revise and peer review research papers.

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HDEV 330. PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN'S BODIES

Students will gain understanding of the many transitions during female adolescence. Course material will focus on multiple developmental domains including physical, cognitive, and social. Course will include the following topics relevant to adolescent female development: puberty, body image, self-esteem, sexual socialization, academic achievement, and relationships. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of the media on the development of adolescent girls.
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HDEV 331. MULTICULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY

Inactive
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HDEV 332. DEVELOPMENT OF ADOLESCENT GIRLS

Students will gain understanding of the many transitions during female adolescence. Course material will focus on multiple developmental domains including physical, cognitive, and social. The course will include the following topics relevant to adolescent female development: puberty, body image, self-esteem, sexual socialization, academic achievement, and relationships. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of the media on the development of adolescent girls. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 333. BIOCULTURE OF LOVE & SEX

What is "love" and why does it consume us? Biological evidence suggests that aspects of romantic love, although mediated by socio-cultural constructs, are hard-wired into the brain. Ultimately, the human brain appears to process lust (the sex drive), attraction (passionate love), and attachment (bonding), in a culturally universal and panhuman fashion. This course will examine the biobehavioral foundations of this and implications for intimate relationships, sex, and family systems. Using a biocultural approach, this course will consider three specific aspects of romantic love: why has it evolved, what are the biological bases, and how do particular cultural environments shape notions and natural expression of love. Course material will concentrate on the biological mechanisms that contribute to love and sex including human evolution, physiology, hormones, genetics, and brain structure. Readings, discussions, and class presentations will delve into the features most relevant to how the brain influences love with respect to human development today, covering a wide breadth of topics to develop a natural perspective of romantic love including: the neurobiology of love, linguistic and cross-cultural notions of love, love at first sight, jealousy, cuddling, infidelity, casual sex, kinship, cooperative breeding, and pair-bonding.

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HDEV 334. NARRATIVE PSYCHOLOGY

This course examines the personal narrative as an increasingly influential paradigm in fostering human health and well-being across the lifespan. We will explore theories of self and identity; trauma narratives; therapeutic narrative interventions; and various issues in Narrative Gerontology including the late-life need for narrative integration and public policy issues relevant to the application of narrative interventions for older adults. You will learn of various research methods in narrative psychology. You will also develop techniques and skills in narrative interviewing, transcribing, analyzing, and report writing. You will experience the phenomenology of narrative research by being interviewed by one your classmates and by interviewing one of your classmates. These interviews will be recorded, transcribed, coded, analyzed and written up in the form of a formal research report. Finally, you will interview one well person over the age of 70 years, then record, transcribe, analyze and write up the report of the interview.

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HDEV 335. GENDER, DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION

This course will examine critical issues related to the influence of gender and development on education. Drawing from diverse societies, in historical and geographical terms, the course will work with a global focus whereby the attempt is to understand the multi-layered power relations framing the teaching-learning of "gender" in formal educational as well as larger cultural contexts. Selected questions include: What implications does gender have for socialization, institutionalized schooling, and lifelong learning? How does gender manifest itself in educational practice, police, and theory in industrialized societies? In what ways have feminisms contributed to an awareness and eradication of inequities, discriminatory practices, and injustice arising from gendered structures, ideologies, and processes underpinning educational and developmental processes? Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 336. BLACK CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

Surveys Black child and adolescent development with a focus on theoretical aspects of psychological development within African Diasporic contexts. This course will explore how the concept of self contextually is connected to Black psychological development and how Black culture has been instrumental in shaping the lives of Black children and adolescents. Also examines how the intersectionality of race, gender, social class, and sexuality relate to Black child and adolescent development. Topics examined include the complexities of color in Black childrens experience; socio-historical/-political contexts of Black child and adolescent development; parenting, racial socialization, and education for Black children and adolescents; racial attitudes and socialization in children; Caribbean (English-, Spanish-, and French-speaking) youth and education; and legal issues and the criminalization of Black youth. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 337. ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT: LGBTQ YOUTH

Although the social science literatures pertaining to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) identity development, homophobia/heterosexism and LGBTQ health behaviors have grown substantially over the past several decades, adequate representations and information pertaining to LGBTQ adolescent lives continue to be lacking in most adolescent development theories, textbooks and courses. This course will present for discussion the unique challenges faced by these populations, including: issues related to identity development, stigma and prejudice, peer and family conflicts, minority stress, representations in media, a lack of educational resources, and inadequate and inaccurate health education. This course will also explore the physiological, cognitive and emotional changes that occur within LGBTQ youth, the socio-historical and cultural contexts that situate this transitional period in life, and the ways that our understanding of sexual orientation and gender expression affects our practice and responsibilities in the human services professions. The significance of anti-homosexual prejudice toward our understanding of heterosexual adolescent behaviors will also be examined. Central to this course will be the principle that an adequate understanding of our own and others' experience of sexuality and gender expression can only be obtained at their intersection with other identities such as race, class, ethnicity, and disability. Open to HDEV junior and senior majors only.
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HDEV 338. FAMILIES: COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES

Family structures (nuclear, extended, intergenerational) and functions (nurturing, economic, social stability) will be explored by examining variations across time, culture, and economic circumstances. The course is designed to introduce students to an interdisciplinary analysis of social and interpersonal influences on the ways in which families are formed and function.

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HDEV 339. BLACK FAMILIES

This course engages students in the psychological study of Black families. A key emphasis will be placed on exploring the socio-historical, -political, and –cultural contexts of Black families in a variety of contexts. This course examines the role of cultural worldviews, values, and norms in Black communities; psychological conceptual frameworks in the study of Black families; parenting styles in Black families; racial and gender role socialization in Black families; parenting, fathering, and mother-daughter relationships in Black families; role of Black extended family; elders and grandparents in Black families; Black families and public policy; kinship and Black families in urban and rural communities; and Black families, public policy, and advocacy. Some specific topics that will be explored include: the role of skin color and Black family dynamics; Black extended families and kinship networks; informal adoption in Black families; and family secrets in Black families. This course requires that students complete pre- and post-course readings and assignments.
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SOCIAL ACTION AND POLICY (HDEV 340-379)

HDEV 341. FAMILY VIOLENCE

The course is an overview of the impact of violence on the family and discussion of strategies for dealing with problems it creates. Symptoms seen in survivors of violence, as well as recommended treatment approaches are discussed. Course topics include spousal violence, parent-child violence, child-parent violence, pre-marital partner violence, same sex partner violence, violence toward family members from outside offenders, sexual, physical, emotional and psychological abuse, recommended treatments for various types of abuse.

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HDEV 344. AFRICAN WOMEN & FEMINISM

Cross listed from AFST 317

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HDEV 346. BLACK WOMEN: SUBJECT FEMINIST MOTHER

The course is an interdisciplinary, feminist examination of the black woman as object, subject, feminist, and mother. Through the works of Audre Lorde, Dorothy Roberts, Patricia Williams, Patricia Hill Collins, Bell Hooks, Toni Cade, and Toni Morrison students will consider the multiple socio-locations of the black woman. Students will be asked to critically engage theory, non-fiction, fiction, performance, and art in an attempt to better understand the lived experiences of black women at the intersection of scholar, daughter, and mother. Students will engage in an ethnographic or autoethnographic research project where they will be responsible for sharing narratives that illuminate the way in which black women are often marginalized in the greater discourse about women, motherhood, feminism, and gender. Students will start thinking about the evolution of feminism around race by placing feminist discourse in conversation with the ethnographic and autoethnographic narratives of black women.

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HDEV 347. RELIGION, IDEOLOGY, AND CULTURE

This course will examine ideological influences on societal structures, with particular attention to the impact of religious belief systems. The socially constructed character of religious life and institutions will be emphasized as we survey the expression of religious ideology in its many dimensions. Students will utilize participant observation approach to gain a deeper understanding of religious symbolism and ritual. We will also take a critical look at how religions function in relation to each other, societal institutions, and in shaping human life span development in the context of their corresponding cultures in various times and places. The role of practitioner bias in the provision of culturally competent services will be explored, with special attention to the differential impact on at-risk or oppressed populations.

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HDEV 348. POLITICS OF EDUCATION

This course will explore critical aspects in the history of education in the US and basic characteristics of educational policy and policy making. A specific emphasis will focus on the socio-economic, -political, and –cultural aspects of education and schooling in the US, the interaction between home, society, and educational institutions, the ways that social inequalities manifest in schools, and the ways that identified emerge through education. A focus will also be placed on understanding contemporary issues in their formulation, implementation and evaluation. Focus on how larger social issues are reflected in the life of schools and how they may be transformed. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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   HDEV 352. GENDER, POWER, AND DIFFERENCE

Examination of how construct of difference raises important questions about problems faced by most women of color in general vis-a-vis historically existent feminism, both as a political movement and as an academic current. Multiple ways of theorizing women's rights and struggles; ideological differences among feminists and women's rights advocates. Focus on issues of race, gender, sexuality and culture within context of reproduction, the family, reproductive rights, feminization of poverty, social services, academic disciplines, language, discourse. Open only to juniors and seniors currrently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 353. IMMIGRANT & REFUGEE HEALTH

Cross listed from AFST 387A

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HDEV 361. GLOBAL  MIGRATION FLOWS & PROCS

The course will provide a broad overview of the histories, geographies, economies and politics of human migration across time and space. The key intent is to understand the reasons behind the displacement and dislocation of populations as well as the processes involved in population transfer across the globe in our contemporary era. However, our analysis of the present will be anchored in multi-faceted historical perspectives. In addition, the course will not only focus on the experiences of those who migrate but will also concern itself with the impact of global migration flows on the spaces from which migrants originate as well as the so-called "host" spaces.

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HDEV 365. PSYCHOLOGY OF RACISM

This course will provide students with an understanding of racism within the context of macro- and –micro level inequalities in the US. A specific emphasis will be placed on societal processes from the perspective of four groups (i.e. Asians, Blacks, Latino/as, Native Americans) and will demonstrate how these groups have experienced and have had an impact on key institutional structures of US society (e.g. legal, political, economic, and educational). The intersectionality of race, gender, social class, and sexuality will provide a conceptual framework to explore the role of addressing asymmetrical dynamics of power, powerlessness, authority, privilege, and resistance in contemporary society. Topics examined include the concept of race as a worldview; socio-historical and –political contexts of racism; understanding racism in educational contexts; racism, incarceration, and the Prison-Industrial-Military Complex; and racism and the politics of exclusion (The case of Hurricane Katrina). Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 366. POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION

This course will provide an examination of economic problems of poverty and racial discrimination. Analysis of public policies such as income maintenance programs, minimum wage legislation, affirmative action, education and housing policies. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV
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HDEV 367. CHILDREN, FAMILY & EDUCATION POLICY

This course will explore the role of educational policy on student and community engagement; early intervention and prevention programs for children, youth, and families; and school-linked, health/social services with social improvement and comprehensive, community-based systems of care.

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HDEV 368. SUBSTANCE ABUSE POLICY

Comprehensive exploration of substance abuse policy in the U.S. Influence of social, cultural, historical, economic and political factors that guide policy making and service delivery. Examination of current drug control debate, including legal and illegal drugs,from an interdisciplinary perspective.
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HDEV 369. AMERICAN EDUCATION IN A GLOBALIZED SOCIETY

This course will explore the impact of globalization on American Education Policy and Practice. Students will investigate the issues and problems that American schools face as a result of globalization and how schools have responded to these issues. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 370. POLICY AND SOCIAL WELFARE IN GLOBAL CONTEXT

Broad understanding of social policy in the U.S. and globally. Examines from a historical and international perspective the development of social policies on issues including poverty, mental health, employment, child welfare. Facilitates critical and creative thinking about philosophical, political and practical bases of social policy. In this course, we make connections between individuals' everyday needs and the larger conditions that make it more or less likely for these needs to be met. For instance, how is a person's gender or race related to his or her access to healthcare and monetary income? What are women's and men's roles in the provision of needs and in welfare systems? How can government policies contribute to social justice? How can human needs be reconciled with preserving the environment? We will address these questions in the context of broad conditions under which today's societies function, most importantly, the global economic system we call capitalism: How do global capitalism and international finance and trade shape national social policy and the provision of needs both in the U.S. and abroad? The conversations and readings in this course will help students understand some of the most pressing issues of our time. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 371. AGGRESSION IN CHILDREN AND YOUTH

This course explores maladaptive aggressive behavior in children and youth. It will examine the processes by which children come to rely on hostile, domineering, defensive and oppositional behaviors in their social interactions. Particular attention will be paid to the role that parents and families play in this process, but the course will also examine the social ecology which places families at greater risks. Different developmental trajectories will be studied that affect the stability and discontinuance of aggression and the risk and protective factors that impact upon persistence and desistance of maladaptive behaviors. Aggression in schools and the community will be explored. Ways of preventing and treating aggression will be examined. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 372. HEALTH CARE POLICY

Inactive
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HDEV 373. HIV/AIDS EPIDEMIC

Overview of the HIV epidemic and examination of biological and socio-cultural factors which perpetuate it. Strategies for intervention and prevention will be discussed. Ethics and dilemmas that arise in practice with this diverse population are explored.

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HDEV 374. PSYCHOLOGY OF HIV AND AIDS

This course will examine psychological aspects of the AIDS epidemic in the United States with a focus on psychological theory and research in this area. Students also will explore the complexities of the AIDS epidemic within the context of the politics of health. A specific emphasis will be placed on a critique of micro- and macro- level processes that influence inequalities in AIDS based on race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexualities. Students will engage in critical analysis and thoughtful reflection in exploring and challenging their values, assumptions, perceptions, and biases related to AIDS. Within this context, students will examine the following topics: HIV virology, clinical course, medical treatments, epidemiology, and antibody testing; integrating primary and behavioral health care; assessment issues and strategies; intervention strategies; prevention issues for the mental health provider; HIV, mental health, and prisons; the interface of HIV and substance use; and HIV in the Greater Binghamton area. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV. Students should provide considerable preparation in planning and structuring their schedules for the rigors of this course. This course requires that students complete pre- and post-course readings and assignments.
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HDEV 375. JUSTICE AND THE LAW

Development of corrections; impact of incarceration on the offender and society. Historical evolution of corrections; role of sentencing in correctional process; role of local, state, and federal agencies; community sanctions; prisoner rights; changing profile of offender population; treatment/rehabilitation in corrections. If you have taken HDEV 419 (Issues in Criminal Justice) in the past, NO NOT register for this course. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 376. WOMEN AND LAW

Does the law offer useful remedies to women who face violence? We will examine this question in three ways. We start by looking at domestic violence. We then look at institutions such as the police, the law courts, shelters, and jails. Do they offer support and protection for women? Do these agencies and actors ever harm women, or make them vulnerable to harm? In the third part of the course, we will turn to women in conflict zones, and see whether the protections of human rights provide security for them.

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HDEV 377. AGGRESSION IN CHILDREN & YOUTH

This course will examine the historical impact of laws as they formed, legitimized/criminalized erotic desires and sexualities in the United States. Students will explore how deviant sexuality defined not just by prevailing Judeo-Christian values but was determined by assumptions about race, ethnicity, gender and class. Within this context specific focus will be given to developing an understanding of how the laws impacted broader understandings of civil liberties and rights. The course will not only focus on the legal contestations of same-sex relationships but will include such areas as the impact of anti-miscegenation statutes, the development of antiprostitution legislation and legal restrictions on immigration in determining legitimate sexual citizenry within the United States.

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HDEV 378. CHILD WELFARE POLICY

This course will provide students with a critical overview of the child welfare system including the legal processes involved with federal and state legislation. A critical emphasis will be placed on how power relations structure organizations and communities within their broader socio-historical, -political, -economic, and –cultural contexts. In this respect, students will engage in critical analysis and thoughtful reflection in exploring and challenging their values, assumptions, perceptions, and biases related to their work as practitioners in communities. Topics that will be explored include but will not be limited to: The Child Welfare System; The Judicial System; Federal Legislation; State Law; The Care and Protection of Children; Adoption; Court Decisions and Client Rights: The Rights of Birth Parents and Foster Parents; Court Decisions and Client Rights: The Rights of Children; Juvenile Delinquency and Child Welfare Reform. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 379. MIGRATION, CITIZENSHIP, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

The course will examine the lives and experiences of migrant populations especially in relation to discourses of belonging and citizenship from a social justice perspective. A key aspect of the course will be an analysis of local, national, and transnational policies and their implementation strategies. A specific feature of this course is its emphasis on the interconnectedness of global, regional, national, and local realities, as they affect the lives of people in everyday domains. We will analyze, using a range of critical and feminist lenses, how social inequities and disparities have been historically created and maintained within and across geographical contexts. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 391. TEACHING PRACTICUM variable credit

For those students interested in a teaching assistant position for credit. Consent of instructor and department approval is required. May be taken Pass/Fail only. The teaching practicum may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV
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HDEV 395. INTERNSHIP variable credit

A learning experience integrating theory with practice in a health, human service, community, education, non-profit, government, or business setting. Consent of instructor and departmental approval required. May be taken Pass/Fail only. Internship courses may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 397. INDEPENDENT STUDY variable credit

Individual research of special topics not offered elsewhere in the curriculum. Demonstrated academic ability and approval of proposed subject are required. Consent of instructor and departmental approval required. Independent study courses may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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CORE COURSE

HDEV 400. SOCIAL JUSTICE

This course will examine the multi-layered processes that create, perpetuate, and challenge stratification, inequalities, and multiple forms of violence within and across societies. A key intent is to examine conceptions of social justice that underpin efforts to address and redress disproportionalities and disparities resulting from contemporary and historical relations of domination and subjugation. The focus of the course moves between the global context and that of the US, whereby students will analyze their own location within power and wealth structures. A special feature of this course is its emphasis on the interconnectedness of global, regional, national, and local realities, as they affect the lives of people in everyday domains. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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WORKING WITH INDIVIDUALS AND GROUPS (HDEV 401-479)

HDEV 402. YOUTH AND SOCIAL POLICY

This course will provide a critical examination of macro- and micro-level processes that relate to the influence of social policy on youth development. Topics examined include but will not be limited to family, media, and community structures. Focus also will be placed on youth-based organizations and alternative forms of policy formation through the lens of race, class, ethnicity and gender identities. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 403. EXPLORING THE HELPING PROFESSIONS

This course is for students considering a career in the helping professions and will enable them to determine how their values, aptitudes and ambitions factor into their choice(s). The course enables students to explore the skills and knowledge they need to become helping professionals and discover the demands and challenges they will face as well as the potential opportunities and rewards in their chosen field of interest. Students will engage in reading, self-reflection and action research to enrich their inquiry. Reliable Internet access throughout the month of January is necessary for completion of online assignments on Blackboard. An all-day seminar on August 6th at the University Downtown Center is also required.

Notes: This is a "hybrid" course. There is one final face to face meeting/seminar/class-time schedule for Wednesday, August 6th at the University Downtown Center.

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HDEV 407. SOCIAL CONSTRUCTN OF WHITENESS

This upper-division course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of critical whiteness studies, understanding whiteness and race as social and cultural constructions with real material effects in everyday life. Through the use of films and texts from sociology, human development, anthropology, history, and ethnic studies, the course will explore the following topics associated with the historical and cultural construction of whiteness: the history of white supremacy in the U.S. and global contexts; the social and cultural construction of race, whiteness, and inequality; white racial identity development; the construction of whiteness within institutions, particularly schooling; intersections of whiteness and white privilege with other markers of difference such as gender and social class; scholarly methods used to understand whiteness; and organizing towards anti-racist action and policy.

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HDEV 408. INTRO SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE

Cross listed from SW 300

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HDEV 413. SOCIAL REFORM IN THE U.S.

Examination of the role of social movements in the formation of the Nation since the conquest, including abolitionism, nativism, populism, progressivism, labor, civil rights, feminism, environmentalism. Power relations between social groups, and institutions, particularly the State. Influence on American society of regional and global processes of transformation.

A major goal throughout this course is to orient students to the social scientific analysis of social movements. We will learn the causes and consequences of social inequality and exclusion through the examination of case studies, and, through the lens of interdisciplinary social movement theory, consider the particular historical characteristics of key social movements. Central questions for understanding social movements include: how do social and economic conditions shape the possibility of social protest? Why do some people become involved in social movements, while others do not? How are social movements organized? Why are some movements successful while others fail? How do movements decide which strategies and tactics to use? How has globalization of the international political economy led some nationally based movements to act transnationally?

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HDEV 414. INSTITUTIONS AND THE LIVES OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS

This course uses a sociopolitical lens to critically examine major child and adolescent serving institutions (e.g., education, healthcare, juvenile justice) and how they impact the lives of children and adolescents. Special attention will be given to: (a) examining current social and economic policy debates that impact youth and their families; (b) the interconnections among institutions and the organizations charged with enacting policies, including priorities for services and interventions; (c) historical analyses of institutions and how political actors have framed social problems; (d) the interconnections among institutions, culture, and individual agency in developmental outcomes for young people; and (e) global comparisons of major child and adolescent serving institutions. Implications for social and political action will be addressed. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.

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HDEV 415. ISSUES IN HUMAN SERVICES

Overview of contemporary human services. Emphasis on variety of ways human needs are met by agencies. Dilemmas faced by human service workers. Open to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.

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HDEV 420. COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of socio-historical and –political contexts, theoretical principles and modalities, and social values of community mental health systems of care. Students will develop knowledge about current changes and trends in community mental health and attention will be provided to both the micro and macro practice. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 422. DIAGNOSTICS OF HELPING PROFESSIONS

The focus of the course is to help the student develop an understanding of the principles of diagnostic procedures and processes; the use of the DSM-IV for learning signs and symptoms of behaviors associated with mental illness; the application of other diagnostic instruments for determining needed interventions for treating a variety of human needs; diagnostic instrument construction; uses and misuses of these resources; tests available and used in clinical practice; and the philosophical, theoretical, and ethical considerations applicable to testing and diagnostic procedures and practices.

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HDEV 423. MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING

This course engages students in the study of Black families and focuses on critical works written by Black social scientists in this area. We also will provide attention to texts written about Black families by other social scientists. We will begin our work by exploring the socio-historical, political, and cultural contexts of Black family life in the African Diaspora. We will critically examine the impact of slavery, racism, sexism, homophobia, and poverty on Black families; Black families in the White imagination; Black theoretical family frameworks; social construction of Black families in the media; kinship and Black families in urban communities; parenting, fathering, and mother-daughter relationships in Black families; Black families in Black ¿Queer¿ Diasporic Frameworks; and Black families, public policy, and advocacy. Some specific topics that will be explored include: the role of skin color and Black family dynamics; Black extended families and kinship networks; informal adoption in Black families; and family secrets in Black families.
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HDEV 425. MODELS OF ADVOCACY: THEORY & PRACTICE

Social issues such as poverty, victimization, mental illness, disabilities and injustice are often addressed through direct client services. Personnel in the helping professions and education work directly with people affected by social issue in an attempt to bring about individual change that will eliminate or ameliorate the problem. With such an approach, the client is often viewed as having some form of deficit, and professionals are positioned as individuals possessing skills helpful in correcting those deficit. An alternative view conceptualizes social issues not as individual problems but as structural problems embedded within society. Rather than changing the individual, structural change within organizations and communities are needed to address social issues and to promote social justice and civil and human rights. This course will first examine the problems with individualistic and deficit orientations to social issues and consider the problematic power differentials that arise between professional and client roles. The course will then consider how diminished status and marginalization may give rise and sustain social issues such as poverty, victimization, mental illness, disabilities and injustice. Having established the basis or need for an alternative approach-social advocacy-the class will proceed to explore different models of advocacy including advocacy for individual clients, shifting power from service providers to clients, community change, and policy advocacy. As such, the course will consider interpersonal advocacy, service innovation, system change and social action as forms of advocacy. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 435. PROSEMINAR IN CIVIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP

This course will familiarize students with the many economic facets of Greater Binghamton and match student leaders with community leaders from business, political and cultural sectors. A specific emphasis will be placed on an examination of the role of both students and mid-sized universities in community and economic development, based on forecasts of the factors that will be necessary to create thriving communities in the 21st century.

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HDEV 440. PRINCIPLES OF CASEWORK

This class focuses on the conceptual, theoretical, and practical foundations for providing case management services to individuals in various population groups that are being served by a wide array of human service organizations, as well as other service sectors of our society. The course entails such topics as historical developments of case management, model approaches to case management, federal and state policies that impact case management practices, case management interventions, strengths-based case management, interdisciplinary teams and case management, emerging trends impacting effective case management service delivery, and typical activities of case managers. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV
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HDEV 442. GROUP COUNSELING

This course will introduce students to the principles and theories of group practice, ethical issues in group counseling, stages of group counseling, group leadership, specialty groups, multicultural issues in group work, and group counseling with special populations. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory and experience and begin the application of this learning to various kinds of groups and work settings. Emphases will be placed on principles of group counseling and the development of group membership and leadership skills by participation in group exercises. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 444. ADMINISTRATION OF PUBLIC SERVICE AGENCIES

Overview of responsibilities in administering the public agency. In-depth examination of the many aspects of public agency administration and leadership. Client-centered approach in fulfilling administrative duties. Development of own philosophy and style of administration and leadership. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 445. COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP AND DEVELOPMENT

Community development theory and practice; community development problems, history, actors. Models of intervention and range of such interventions, including housing development and community economic development. Issues of who defines community development agenda; relationship between physical and non-physical development. Examination of selected recent trends and emerging policy issues. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 447. CONFLICT RESOLUTION

Inactive
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HDEV 449. HOLISTIC HEALTH PRACTICE  2 credits

Cross listed from NURS 332

 HDEV 450. CASEWORK: SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Inactive
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HDEV 451. CLINICAL ASSESSMENT

The focus of the course is to help the student develop an understanding of the principles of diagnostic procedures and processes; the use of the DSM for learning signs and symptoms of behaviors associated with mental illness; the application of other diagnostic instruments for determining needed interventions for treating a variety of human needs; diagnostic instrument construction; uses and misuses of these resources; tests available and used in clinical practice; and the philosophical, theoretical, and ethical considerations applicable to testing and diagnostic procedures and practices. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 454. DYNAMICS OF CHANGE IN CLIENT-CENTERED ORGANIZATIONS

This course introduces students to the challenges of leadership in the human services. The course will assist students preparing for the helping professions in becoming knowledgeable and comfortable with the idea that human service workers of today and tomorrow must be capable of readying their organizations for constant change. As future leaders in the human services, students will become familiar with the forces and trends of change that affect the field and learn through the comparative study of leadership theory and local initiatives how they might successfully guide the profession through the transitions that lie ahead. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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HDEV 455. CAREER BUILDING IN HUMAN SERVICES

Cross listed with MASS 580A

The focus of this course is providing students with an overview of career opportunities in human services and the responsibilities professionals find themselves accountable for in this vast vocational domain. There will be an in-depth examination of the many aspects of public agencies and accompanying leadership demands. A client-centered and strategic approach to agency functions is stressed for fulfilling all levels of duties. Special attention is given to the development of one's own philosophy and style of working within human services.

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HDEV 465. RESEARCHING IMMIGRANT LIVES

This course will explore the complex and multiple ways in which citizenship is conceptualized and experienced for immigrants at global, societal, institutional, community, and individual levels. A key emphasis will be placed on understanding intersecting epistemologies and research methodologies in oral historical, qualitative, cultural studies, and feminist contexts. The objective is to conceptualize and actualize a collaborative interdisciplinary research project that will make a significant contribution to the lived experiences of immigrants. The project also will highlight policy and advocacy imperatives for researching immigrant lives and apply a social justice and rights-based philosophy to an examination of citizenship, immigration, emigration, and immigrant lives in transnational, national, and local contexts.

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HDEV 466. ALTERNATE TREATMENT STRATEGIES IN SUBSTANCE ABUSE

This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop an
understanding of substance abuse and substance abuse treatment. Students will examine concepts of substance abuse and chemical dependency; psychoactive substances; chemical dependency and physical and mental health; theories of substance abuse; principles of assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and pharmacology; individual, group, couple, and family modalities in substance abuse counseling; and multicultural issues in substance abuse counseling and interventions.

Emphasis will be placed on the study of substance abuse treatment and students will formally investigate, observe, and experience, in person, one such program. The program is Habilitat, in Kaneohe, Hawaii, which is an alternative and creative treatment program with a highly successful history. The program is long-term, residential, and based on the "Therapeutic Community" model. Students will be engaged in learning about the program and have opportunities to actively participate in the foundational constructs of the Habilitat treatment process for those addicted to substances. This course will take place in Hawaii and require that students complete pre- and post- course readings and assignments. Departmental approval is required for this course.

CORE COURSE

HDEV 475. PRACTICUM IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

This course will provide students with opportunities to engage in the integration and application of theory and practice through a practicum. Students will explore the pragmatic, nuts-and-bolts type issues of the practicum experience to a more in-depth exploration with concerns such as hierarchical relationships in service-delivery contexts, the implications of social justice, and the long-term as well as everyday workings of agencies. Building on a critical approach to work in the field of human development, a critical emphasis will be placed on how power relations structure organizations and communities within their broader socio-historical, -political, -economic, and -cultural contexts. As such, students will examine the implications of social identities and positionality in relation to race/ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexuality for experiences in the field as interns and eventually as human development practitioners. During this process, students will engage in critical analysis and thoughtful reflection in exploring and challenging their values, assumptions, perceptions, and biases related to their work as practitioners in communities. This course is only open to students with senior standing. Prerequisites: HDEV 200 and HDEV 300.
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HDEV 495. INTERNSHIP variable credit

A learning experience integrating theory with practice in a health, human service, community, education, non-profit, government, or business setting. Faculty sponsor and departmental approval is required. Consent of instructor and departmental approval required. May be taken Pass/Fail only. Internship courses may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.Back to Top

HDEV 497. INDEPENDENT STUDY variable credit

Individual research of special topics not offered elsewhere in the curriculum. Demonstrated academic ability and approval of proposed subject are required. Consent of instructor and departmental approval required. Independent study courses may be taken for 1-4 credits only. Open only to juniors and seniors currently matriculated in HDEV.
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Last Updated: 11/25/14