Institute for Genocide and Mass Atrocity Prevention

Faculty and advisory committee bios

Co-Directors

Max Pensky is professor of philosophy and co-director of the Institute for Genocide and Mass Atrocity Prevention. His main areas of scholarly research include contemporary political theory and political philosophy and the philosophy of international law, with an emphasis on the normative foundations of current practices of transitional justice, the post-conflict legal and political demands on recovering states, and the relation between domestic and international criminal law. He also publishes regularly on critical theory, including the works of Theodor Adorno and Jürgen Habermas, and on issues in contemporary German political culture. He is the author of two books and over 50 articles and chapters. He has held fellowships at Johann-Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt, Cornell University, Oxford University and the University of Ulster. Current research projects include a comprehensive study of the normative issues surrounding the use of domestic amnesties for international crimes, and the concept of impunity and the implications of an international legal-political norm against impunity for international crimes.
Email: mpensky@binghamton.edu
Website: https://binghamton.edu/philosophy/people/faculty-pensky.html

Nadia Rubaii is associate professor of public administration and co-director of the Institute for Genocide and Mass Atrocity Prevention. Her research examines the internal and external factors that contribute to the effectiveness of master’s degree programs intended for public and nonprofit sector professionals, with a particular emphasis on alternative pedagogies for the most effective contextual learning and comparisons of international and domestic quality assurance systems. For many years her research has been targeted to helping universities and public service organizations better serve diverse publics, be inter-culturally effective and to promote social equity. Although Rubaii’s research, teaching and professional service activities have been in all parts of the world, most of her recent work is based in Latin America. She has held Fulbright appointments in Colombia and Venezuela, and she is founding co-editor of GOBERNAR: The Journal of Latin American Public Policy and Governance. She has held leadership positions in the Network of Schools of Public Policy, Affairs and Administration (NASPAA), La Red Interamericana de Educación en Administración Pública (INPAE) and the International Comparative Policy Analysis Forum (ICPA-Forum).
Email: nadia.rubaii@binghamton.edu
Website: https://www.binghamton.edu/public-administration/faculty-staff/rubaii.html

Doctoral Assistant

Brendan Skip Mark is a doctoral candidate in political science at Binghamton University. His research examines the intersections between economic policy, human rights and conflict. He is currently working as the research assistant in the Institute for Genocide and Mass Atrocity Prevention. His dissertation explores the effects of compliance with International Monetary Fund (IMF) conditionality on labor rights, protest and repression using a new dataset measuring compliance with IMF programs along nine different policy areas. His research suggests that IMF policy compliance undermines labor rights sparking protests in labor-abundant countries as well as increased repression meant to push through unpopular policies. His other work explores attitudes toward refugees and immigrant; political uses of force and human rights; the effects of foreign direct investment and trade on labor rights; population dynamics and human rights respect; empirical methodology and measurement issues; and the relationship between state capacity, democracy and children's rights.  
Email: bmark2@binghamton.edu

Faculty Advisory Committee

Susan Appe is assistant professor of public administration. Her research focuses on government-civil society organization (CSO) relations and the characteristics and evolution of organized civil society working in social development, humanitarian relief and human rights promotion in both developed and developing countries. Her research has focused on the shifting political, regulatory and funding environments for civil society, particularly in Latin America. Currently, she has active research projects examining (1) how and why CSOs form civil society networks and the implications of doing so, (2) the process of shifts in the development aid architecture and its implications for civil society, (3) CSOs within the framework of sustainable development and the post-2015 agenda and (4) the role of CSOs in South-South development cooperation.
Email: sappe@binghamton.edu
Website: https://www.binghamton.edu/public-administration/faculty-staff/appe.html

Bat-Ami Bar On is professor of philosophy and Women and Gender and Sexuality Studies, director of the Institute for the Advanced Studies in the Humanities. Her research addresses normative issues that arise due to violent political conflicts. She currently has two research projects. One rethinks jus in bello rules for war from the point of view of political normativity. The other attempts to answer the question, "What, if anything, is owed people who are displaced by armed political conflict and by whom?” Her research looks at the immediate post-WWII period for guidance since it is during this period that much of today’s practice-oriented normative language regarding collective obligations of this sort was forged.
Email: ami@binghamton.edu
Website: http://bingweb.binghamton.edu/~ami/

Lubna N. Chaudhry is associate professor of human development. She has studied violence emanating from armed conflict and structural violence since 1998. In addition to studying contemporary violence such as the civil war situation in Karachi, Pakistan and the Talibanization of the Swat Valley, she has conducted oral histories with survivors of the 1947 India-Pakistan Partition and the 1971 genocide in East Pakistan.
Email: chaudhry@binghamton.edu
Website: https://www.binghamton.edu/ccpa/phd/teaching_faculty/lubna_chaudhry.html 

David Cingranelli is professor of political science. He has written widely on human rights, democracy and governance. His 2007 book with Rodwan Abouharb, Human Rights and Structural Adjustment, (Cambridge University Press) demonstrated the negative human rights impacts of World Bank and IMF program lending in developing countries. He is a former president of the Human Rights Section of the American Political Science Association. Until 2012, he served as the co-director of the Cingranelli and Richards (CIRI) Human Rights Data Project, the largest and most widely used human rights data set in the world. Presently, he and Mikhail Filippov are working in collaboration with the United States Political Instability Task Force on a successor to the CIRI project, which will be called the “Rights” data project. 
Email: davidc@binghamton.edu
Website: https://www.binghamton.edu/political-science/people/faculty/david-cingranelli.html

Dave Clark is professor of political science at Binghamton. His research interests include bargaining models and foreign policy decision making. His recent work, funded by the Political Instability Task Force, collects information on protests against governments – the project has produced the Mass Mobilization data set which contains more than 12,000 protests in more than 160 countries since 1990. A new project examines government efforts to repress citizens in order to deter dissent.
Email: dclark@binghamton.edu
Website: https://www.binghamton.edu/political-science/people/faculty/dave-clark.html 

John Frazier is a distinguished service professor in the Department of Geography and a member of the Chancellor’s Distinguished Academy. His research focuses on ethnic and racial geography and applied urban geography, with a particular emphasis on migration and ethnic settlement patterns and the immigrant experience. His recent research focuses on ethnic tensions in changing environments. He is the founder and director of the annual International Race, Ethnicity and Place Conferences.
Email: frazier@binghamton.edu
Website: https://www.binghamton.edu/geography/people/john-frazier.html 

Douglas R. Holmes is distinguished professor of anthropology. He is currently writing a book with the working title, Fascism at Eye Level, which examines the emergence of contemporary configurations of radicalism in Europe. Holmes is known primarily for an ethnographic trilogy exploring various aspects of political and cultural economy. Each book is based on extended field research: Cultural Disenchantments: Worker Peasantries in Northeast Italy (Princeton); Integral Europe: Fast-capitalism, Multiculturalism, Neo-fascism (Princeton); and Economy of Words: Communicative Imperatives in Central Banks (Chicago). He is also involved in an ongoing collaboration with George E. Marcus concerned with the re-functioning of ethnographic method for the exploration of cultures of expertise.
Email: dholmes@binghamton.edu
Website: http://www.binghamton.edu/sociology/people/ricardo.html 

Ricardo René Larémont is professor of political science and sociology. His work principally focuses on North Africa and the Sahel. He is an expert on political Islam, Islamic law, conflict resolution, democratization, civil/military relations and migration. He has written widely, and his principal books include: Revolution, Revolt, and Reform in North Africa (Routledge: 2013); Al-rabia al- arabi: al-intifada w'al islah w'al-thawra (with Youssef Sawani) (Al-Maaref, 2013); Islamic Law and Politics in Northern Nigeria (Africa World Press: 2011); Borders, Nationalism, and the African State (Lynne Rienner: 2005); The Causes of War and the Consequences of Peacekeeping in Africa (Heinemann: 2002); and Islam and the Politics of Resistance in Algeria, 1783-1992 (Africa World Press: 2000). His research has been supported by the Carnegie Corporation, the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the United States Institute of Peace, the Office of Naval Research and the United States Department of Education. Larémont obtained a bachelor's degree cum laude from New York University School of Arts and Sciences, a juris doctor from the New York University School of Law and a doctorate from Yale University.
Email: laremont@binghamton.edu
Website: http://www.binghamton.edu/sociology/people/ricardo.html

Francesca Piana is a research assistant in the Department of History. She is a historian of European and international history. Her teaching and research interests include the history of international organizations, transnational movements and NGOs, humanitarian aid and the missions, prisoners of war, refugees, women and gender in the 20th century. She is currently completing her first book, Europe under Threat. International Humanitarianism, Prisoners of War, and Refugees, 1918-1930, where she provides a history of the complex international categorization of refugees in the aftermath of WWI. She is also conducting research for her second book, tentatively titled ‘Parallel Lives’: Women, Imperialism, and Humanitarianism, 1880-1950. In both her first and second books, she looks at the discourses, policies and practices implemented to save Armenian refugees after the genocide.
Email: fpiana@binghamton.edu
Website: https://binghamton.academia.edu/FrancescaPiana

Florenz Plassmann is professor of economics and associate dean of graduate studies and research at Harpur College of Arts and Sciences at Binghamton University. He earned his PhD in economics from Virginia Tech in 1997. He has served as chair of the Economics Department at Binghamton University, as a program director of the Economics Program at the National Science Foundation and he has been a visiting resident scholar at the International Monetary Fund. His research focuses on issues of collective decision making, specifically on the design of mechanisms for the revelation of the valuations of private and public goods, as well as on voting theory. His research has been published in the Journal of Law and Economics, Public Choice, Social Choice and Welfare, the Journal of Public Economic Theory and the European Journal of Political Economy, among others.
Email: fplass@binghamton.edu
Website: https://www.binghamton.edu/economics/people/tenured-and-tenure-track-faculty/plassmann.html

Jean H. Quataert is professor of history and co-editor of the Journal of Women's History. She is a trained German historian whose recent work extends to global and transnational history, notably on human rights and international law. On the heels of an American Historical Association teaching pamphlet (The Gendering of Human Rights in the International Systems of Law in the Twentieth Century, 2006), she also published Advocating Dignity: Human Rights Mobilizations in Global Politics (2009). Among her many articles are those on international law as, for example, “International Law and Human Rights: Diverging and Converging Histories,” New Global Studies, 6, 2, December 2012, online, found through http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/ngs; “International Law and the Laws of War, 1864-1914,” in 1914-1918 online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War, pp. 1-20, available at www.1914-1918-online.net; and also “War-Making and the Restraint of Law: The Formative Years, 1864-1914,” in The Cambridge History of War: War and the Modern World (l850-2005), eds., Roger Chickering, et. al, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012, pp. 142-162. She also has written on feminist contributions to global development debates in “A Knowledge Revolution: Transnational Feminist Contributions to International Development Agendas and Policies, 1965-1995,” special issue on “Engendering Transnational Policy History,” Global Social Policy, vol. 14, no. 2 (August 2014): 210-227. She brings these interests to her teaching; course offerings include human rights since 1945, a lecture course, and senior research seminars on human rights and international law. 
Email: profquat@binghamton.edu
Website: https://www.binghamton.edu/history/people/faculty/jean.html 

Aleksey Tikhomirov received his doctorate in educational theory and practice from Binghamton University, and is a 2004 graduate of the Master in Public Administration program at Binghamton. He has taught at the Graduate School of Education, School of Management and College of Community and Public Affairs, and for the Languages across the Curriculum program, including courses in educational policy and school reform, organizational behavior, group dynamics, global strategic management, public administration, and leadership and change in organizations. His research interests have focused on history of management, history of school reform and modern-day reformers of schools, educational leaders such as school superintendents as well as leadership in non-profit and for-profit sectors. His research has appeared in the Journal of Management History, Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, Leadership Quarterly, Russian Journal of Management and Public Administration Review.
Email: atikhomi@binghamton.edu

Last Updated: 3/2/17