Judaic Studies (BA)

Program Overview

The Judaic studies program offers students an interdisciplinary perspective on three millennia of Jewish culture: Jewish social, religious and political history; Jewish literature — biblical, modern and postmodern; Jewish thought; and modern Israel. The curriculum draws from both the humanities and the social sciences, and covers a wide array of topics including modern Hebrew and Yiddish. Judaic studies majors can construct their own areas of specialization within the major.

Area specializations include but are not limited to: Jewish communal service, Jewish history, Jewish thought, Holocaust studies, literature and culture, and those that are individually designed. Judaic studies also offers minors in Judaic studies, Israel studies and Hebrew, and a minor in religious studies.

Degrees Offered

  • BA in Judaic Studies
  • BA in Hebrew

Internships, research opportunities and more

Students are encouraged to take internships for credit at local Jewish agencies. Internship opportunities are available through Hillel Academy, the Jewish Community Center, The Reporter (newspaper), Judaic studies, the Jewish Federation of Broome County, synagogue administration and Chabad House. In addition, students can take advantage of study-abroad opportunities in Israel, offered through the SUNY system, to enhance their learning experience.

Coursework

Some courses to consider in your first year:

After You Graduate

Judaic studies majors acquire a wide range of skills that are easily transferable to the real world, including an ability to adapt in cross-cultural settings, analyze and relate to unfamiliar settings, communicate logically, make critical observations, and mediate conflicts and disputes in basic values, etc. Majors graduate with a liberal arts degree that prepares them for both graduate studies and for professional studies such as law, business or public administration, as well as careers in Jewish communal organizations.

The listing below offers examples of potential career paths, some of which may require further study or training:

  • academic advisor
  • community activist
  • cultural center coordinator
  • foreign service officer
  • fundraiser
  • historic site interpreter
  • international student advisor
  • lawyer
  • multicultural consultant
  • policy analyst
  • professor
  • research assistant
  • teacher
  • translator

For more information, visit the Judaic Studies website.