Graduate Community of Scholars (GCOS)

Welcome to the Graduate Community of Scholars!

The Graduate Community of Scholars (GCOS) at Binghamton University offers resources to help you thrive in your personal life and gain a competitive edge in your professional life - whether you're starting your master's degree or completing your doctoral degree.

We are a learning community that welcomes all graduate students, at all levels, in all disciplines.

Each semester, GCOS hosts a series of workshops designed to develop the graduate community as scholars, teachers, professionals and members of the Binghamton University community. These workshops join with various campus organizations, departments, centers or units to tailor the information to the interests and needs of graduate life. These workshops follow the Binghamton University PREP Model, which resolves around four themes and competencies that are vital for every graduate student: planning, resilience, engagement and professionalism.

Planning: Learn skills that emphasize proper planning throughout your graduate career, such as resume- and grant-writing, thinking like a professional and creating a syllabus.

Resilience: Learn strategies to ensure and thrive through writing planning for dissertations and theses and managing mental health as a graduate student.

Engagement: Learn strategies for effective communication, networking, and active involvement in the workplace, classroom and community.

Professionalism: Learn and maintain the highest professional standards in teaching, research and publishing.

These workshops are free and open to all graduate students in all disciplines.

If you are interested in more information or if you have a request for a particular workshop topic, please email Ellen Tilden at gcos@binghamton.edu.

Below is our FALL 2021 workshop schedule: 

Getting Ready for Fall - Part I: Set Your Writing Project Goals
Friday, September 10, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

Register here.

In Part One of this two-part series of guided workshops, you’ll do a step-by-step review of your current writing and research project. You’ll review the current status of the project and begin the process of breaking the project down into tasks and actions. Then, you’ll review those tasks and actions so that you can identify your priorities and goals for your work this semester.  We will also discuss how to sustain yourself (maintain energy, maintain motivation, face setbacks) over the course of a long project.

Getting Ready for Fall - Part II: Map Your Goals to Time
Friday, September 17, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

Register here.

In Part Two of this two-part series of guided workshops, you’ll explore how you can map your priorities and goals to the time available.  We will do a step-by-step review of your time commitments so that you can identify the best times for you to write. We will discuss how to organize your writing sessions so that you can use your time well and discuss strategies that help writers maintain motivation and maintain a sense of control over the process, such as routine reflection.  We’ll continue a discussion of how to prioritize sustaining yourself even when you feel as though you have no time.

Teaching Assistant (TA) Training Workshop
Friday, October 1, Noon - 2:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Andrea MacArgel & Cherie Vanputten, Center for Learning and Teaching (CLT)

Join us to learn more about improving your teaching skills, overcoming common classroom issues, and developing active learning strategies for your students.

Registration is now closed.

Defining Your Teaching Philosophy
Friday, October 8, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

Register here.

When graduate students face the prospect of writing the Teaching Philosophy Statement, they often realize that they’ve never quite worked out their philosophy of teaching.

In this workshop, we’ll look at questions to ask yourself about how you approach teaching and how you understand the goals of teaching in your discipline. We’ll explore some resources about teaching that can help you clarify your thinking. This is a workshop for graduate students at any stage in their program or teaching career. 

Writing Your Teaching Philosophy Statement
Friday, November 12, Noon - 1:00 p.m.
Online (via Zoom)
Robert Danberg, Coordinator of Campus-Wide Writing Support, The Writing Initiative

Register here.

In this workshop, we’ll look at some common approaches to teaching philosophy statements that can be helpful across disciplines. We’ll discuss models for the final product, and focus on how to explain and portray your philosophy in compelling ways.